Mama Leilani Top by Peach Patterns

I’m trying really hard to catch up on some blog posts and the reality is those that were drafted 1 year ago or more are probably never going to be posted, especially for the kids clothes as they don’t fit them quite the same anymore.

Back to my stuff though, I tested the popular Mama Leilani Dress & Top by Peach Patterns back in November of last year using some stash fabric I took from my mum. I’m not quite sure what the composition is, it feels like a rayon but frays like crazy. Not that it matters as I’ve used it now and it suited the design of the Leilani.


This pattern is really versatile and there is lots to like about it with both top and dress options and a single or double ruffle overlay. The dress can be made knee length or a high-low 3/4 length. There aren’t any closures to worry about and has narrow shoulder ties. There is a detailed photo tutorial to make the straps adjustable with bra-style ring and sliders. Sizes are from  US 2 (Aust/UK 6) (Eur 34) through to US 16 (Aust/UK 20) (Eur 48).

I ended up making the top with the single overlay. It’s a quick sew and has a nice, neat finishing at the neckline. The ruffle and top is finished with a narrow rolled hem. This pattern is best made up in light weight woven fabric to get a nice flowing garment.

There is also a girls version available if you love the style for your little ones.

*The pattern was provided to me free of charge for testing but all opinions expressed are my own and I received a copy of the finalised pattern for taking part.



Sequoia Cargo Pants by Itch to Stitch

Cargo pants are a really versatile wardrobe staple. They can be worn casual with thongs or sneakers or worn dressy with heels and classy flats.

I tested* the Sequoia Cargo Pants (**aff. link) by Itch to Stitch because I was lacking a pair in my wardrobe and judging by my Pinterest board I was needing some. My initial inspiration was to make some khaki ones but the right fabric was no where to be found. I first made a muslin using some khaki polyester/cotton fabric just to check fit so didn’t really finish them beyond basic construction, although I did only baste them together, so taking them apart shouldn’t be a long process.

My final pair were made using navy drill (100% cotton) and navy knit for the waistband. The pattern comes in multiple sizes (00-20), ability to print in layers a number of features for a professional finish. They have a functional fly front zipper, front and back patch pockets and a long pants or shorts options. I opted for the pants version which also has side cargo pants pockets and a leg strap to roll them up if preferred (which I omitted).

I ended up going down a size from my muslin stage and otherwise construction went together well. These have all the traditional features of Cargo Pants and the ribbed waistband make them extra comfortable. I couldn’t find the hardware/snaps to add to my pockets after visiting three fabric stores so left them off. The instructions for the zipper fly are very good if you haven’t done one before they can be somewhat intimidating.

Considering there are so many fiddly bits with the pockets and front fly, construction is relatively simple and fast if you are sequential and organised when sewing these up. The main disruption while sewing these I think is the pressing between sewing mostly due to the pockets.


I have worn mine quite a few times since making these and they are baggier than when I first made them so I think next time I may go down one size for personal preference. I have so many versions of these in my head that I want to make and I actually do plan on finishing off my muslin pair once I’ve seam ripped them apart. It also may be slightly visible if you look closely at my pockets, that I used white serger thread, ooops!!

*The pattern was provided to me free of charge for testing but all opinions expressed are my own and I received a copy of the finalised pattern for taking part.

**This post contains affiliate links to Itch To Stitch

Rebecca Page Brand Ambassador The Ultimate Bunting Kit

November for me was a busy month. My baby was close to two months old and it was nearing the end of the school year and was also trying to fit in my christmas shopping and of course, sadly packed my sewing room to make it the baby’s nursery. I decided to make The Ultimate Bunting Kit  (**aff. link). This was perfect timing really as I had always wanted one for the nursery and since baby girl was born in September I knew the gender and was able to select the colours I preferred. I used all fabric from my stash, which were either top pop poplins (100% polyester) or cotton poplins and I lined the pieces with white top pop poplin. This is really a great stash busting project if you are looking for something quick to make, unless you choose a bunting with appliques and complicated shapes.

There are a number of pattern shapes included in this pattern, really as the name suggests it has everything, but I went with basic/traditional triangles. The instructions provide you with a number of ways to finish the bunting, however I chose to sew the pieces right sides together, then turn them right side out and topstitch. Alternatively you could sew them wrong sides together and cut the raw edges with pinking shears. There really isn’t a right or wrong way.

I chose these particular colours as they are soft and feminine for a baby girls room and thinking as she grows up they won’t date. I also opted to finish the bunting with white pre made bias tape. I can’t recall exactly how much spacing I allowed between the triangles but think it was roughly 2 inches, it’s personal preference.

The Bunting Kit is also a freebie at the Rebecca Page shop so if you don’t need it right now pop it in your cart anyway because it makes a great gift, festive season decor or you could even use the shapes to applique clothes and pillows. Possibilities are endless.

** This post contains affiliate links to Rebecca Page

Rebecca Page Brand Ambassador Emma Top and Dress

I am so behind on posting my monthly makes from Rebecca Page.  As an update, briefly how this works is that we sign up to sew something for the month from a choice of 4 or 5 patterns and then promote them on social media. It may be an existing pattern already tested or a new pattern. They aren’t always clothing related either.

The first and last thing I published here was the Swim backpack and pencil case in August so I have lots of catching up to do.

In September I chose to sew the already released Emma Top and Dress  (**aff. link) which is also available as a ladies version. I used aqua and blue rayon (100% rayon). The dress has a high fitted neckline and then flares out for great twirl factor. There is a keyhole opening at the back for which I used a large white button from the stash. It’s a great value for money pattern as there are 5 length options: top, tunic, knee (tunic + 1 tier of ruffles), tea (tunic + 2 tiers) and maxi (tunic + 3 tiers). Plus an optional sash to tie at the waist and you can also choose to have it lined or unlined. The kids version goes from sizes 0-3 months right up to 11-12 years.


I made the knee length version which is a tunic and 1 tier of ruffles added to the bottom. I went up a size for length for my daughter as she is slightly above average for height and it fits perfectly. This dress was definitely a success as she has worn it so much since I made and has received many compliments.

The dress itself is quick to sew, especially if it’s left unlined, like mine was. The instructions are really clear and concise, you are bound to get great results. The women’s version is also such a versatile pattern, one which I will get around to eventually, just not practical in my day to day life yet whilst still nursing bubsy.



** This post contains affiliate links to Rebecca Page

Candy Relaxed Fit Knit Cardigan by Sinclair Patterns

This is another test I did whilst pregnant thinking I will also be able to wear it post baby. I think it’s also the last of my maternity sews.

The Candy Relaxed Fit Knit Cardigan  (**affiliate link) by Sinclair Patterns is exactly that. It is a loose fitting cardigan with a waterfall style neckline and nice deep pockets. It’s best made up with light to heavy weight knit fabric with at least 20-30% stretch, more so for the sleeves so you could perhaps mix up fabrics.  It can quite easily be sewn up in one day, or even a couple of hours, it’s that quick.

Like a lot of the Sinclair Patterns, sizing goes from XS-XXL but also include the petite, regular and in this case tall pattern pieces. I tested* mine in the regular length using some glitter double knit (unsure of content). If you are new to sewing with knits the pattern has some great information but also photos accompany the instructions.

The most important thing to bare in mind is that the wrong side of the fabric will show with this type of neckline so choosing one with less contrast might be better but I don’t mind mine as the edges are finished neatly and raw edges are hidden.

The deep pockets are great for carrying a phone, keys, small purse and keeping hands warm and of course can be omitted if preferred. I would love to add a few more of these to my wardrobe before autumn but not sure if I’ll manage that.

*The pattern was provided to me free of charge for testing but all opinions expressed are my own and I received a copy of the finalised pattern for taking part.

**Affiliate Link: I get a tiny commission to fund my fabric habit

Ilse Vest by DesignerStitch Patterns

I really only apply to test garments that I think will work for me and my style and occasionally I get it wrong. In this case I applied to test* the Ilse Vest by DesignerStitch Patterns ** (Affiliate link) as I had this vest on my Pinterest board for ages and wanted to recreate a similar look. Finding look-a-like fabric on the other hand was proving difficult.


I then shopped my stash and was going to use some brown herringbone fabric with faux leather binding, however I couldn’t find matching faux leather binding.

I thought about it and decided to try my luck at one more fabric store, otherwise I was on the hunt for some blankets. Which in itself is laughable as we are in the middle of summer.

By now I have tested lots of patterns from Ann and her testing process is quite streamline with great comraderi amongst the group and often minimal, if any pattern changes during testing. The pattern comes in a large range of sizes AUS 6-26 with separate cup sizes – B, C, D, DD(E) and printing with the layer option. There are really only 4 pattern pieces not including the belt. Ann’s experience in the drafting and fashion industry is evident by how patterns fit and also the thorough and clear instructions.


I eventually settled on this black and white plaid (polyester/acrylic). I didn’t realise until I was fussy cutting that it doesn’t actually have a pattern repeat so I tried my best to match the vertical and horizontal lines. The construction was extremely fast, especially as it’s not lined. In the end I found some faux leather look stretch fabric, the kind you would use to make leggings, to make my binding. Because of the stretch I didn’t bother cutting it on the bias. I think I cut it about 2 inches wide from memory. I wish I had used a walking foot to attach my binding as there is some twisting which I have tried my best to iron straight.

I also decided to make the included obi belt as my closure. I wish I had interfaced my belt however because of the stretch fabric it doesn’t keep it’s shape. For the ties I used black ribbon in the corresponding finished width of the ties because I didn’t want to tackle my black stretch fabric to make the ties.

I’m excited for when the cooler weather is upon us as I will have a great layering piece to wear.

*The pattern was provided to me free of charge for testing but all opinions expressed are my own and I received a copy of the finalised pattern for taking part.

**This post contains affiliate links to DesignerStitch Patterns

Maternity Crossroads Vest by Twig + Tale

The Crossroads Vest by Twig + Tale had already gone into testing but they put the call out for a couple of pregnant testers for the add-on features. I was 39 weeks pregnant at this time, hoping baby would stay put until I had it finished.


Thinking ahead to when I would probably actually wear the Crossroads Vest, as we were heading into summer during testing, I tested* the maternity version using a warm marble grey platinum fleece (polyester) and multi coloured printed rayon #4 chevron (100% rayon) as the lining. I made the flutter sleeve with the curved, dropped back. I went for the simpler version as I thought my sewing time may be cut short. The flutter sleeve was not a good option with this thicker fabric as it sticks out away from the body but I’m okay with that.

The Crossroads vest features a double layer across the chest with a petal shape and as aforementioned the maternity option. It is actually the perfect add-on to the Women’ Pathfinder Vest which in itself has lots of options.

It is a really quick vest to sew. Everything matched up perfectly and the fit was spot on. The are highly detailed instructions with photos at each step. I think my rayon stretched a bit and therefore is a bit longer at the back curve. Again, it’s something I can live with as it’s kind of a run pop of colour.

As you can see, the vest fits both at 39 weeks pregnant and post pregnancy and I will be happy to take this for a test run as our colder weather sets in, but hopefully that is a while away yet.


*The pattern was provided to me free of charge for testing but all opinions expressed are my own and I received a copy of the finalised pattern for taking part.