Kerry Capelet by DesignerStitch Patterns

It’s been a while since I contemplated making something from my Cold Weather SWAP 2016, and realistically I think by the time I’m even half way through sewing the remainder of the items, winter will be over. I am motivated to sew but I have been living in jeans and a sweater with a jacket and haven’t had anywhere exciting to go really.

I did however make my cape. My inspiration was something flowy, less structured. I’ve had this fabric since January of this year and bought it on a whim when it was on sale, although it was the heart of summer. Stars aligned and the testing* call went out for the Kerry Capelet by DesignerStitch Patterns.

Kerry cape back 2                            Kerry cape side 3 Kerry cape side 4

The fabric is black Mexican Inca poncho (polyester/cotton), and although I have prewashed the fabric, it’s a tad stiff perhaps for this project, not to mention it’s a smelly fabric, even after laundering. It has that hessian bag kind of smell. Hopefully with more wear it will soften up, and smell better. The cape is completely lined with black pongee lining (100% polyester). The Kerry Capelet and has the option of two lengths. I made the short version and it’s a great length.

There are lots of pattern pieces and the instructions are really thorough, with both images and photos to walk you through construction. It helps if you have done a bagged lining before but by no means necessary. It just helps to visualise things a little better. There is a bit of hand sewing at the end to close up the lining and armholes and to keep the hem from peeking out.  Kind of cathartic at the end of this project!

I had a hard time finding a closure I liked. I didn’t feel any buttons were appropriate, and after some surfing on the net, decided a leather buckle would be cool, but not so cool to purchase, it was hard to find and finally came up with a D-ring leather buckle. I think I may like it better with a second buckle sewn on,  I can’t really decide though, but considering that one buckle cost $12.00, the buckles would probably end up costing more than the fabric itself relative to size.

buckle

I’m really happy with this cape, it’s classy and cozy. Now I just need more outings to wear it too.

*The pattern was provided to me free of charge for testing but all opinions expressed are my own and I received a copy of the finalised pattern for taking part.

Ladies Classic Cape from Big Little…It’s Fast, Simple and Classy

I have been doing lots of pattern testing lately. I always put my hand up because I really enjoy working to a deadline and being methodical about following instructions,  helping out with alterations, errors etc. and stepping out of my comfort zone, trying silhouettes that possibly aren’t my style.

This pattern is a big winner for me, designed by Big Little and they have so many of what I would call, winter wonderland patterns. When the call went out for testers*, for the Ladies Classic Cape I was very eager. I don’t have anything like this in my wardrobe and envisioned a lovely and warm wool version however my environment is hot and humid. I am savouring the day I can wear this though, I love winter fashion.

Cape hanger

buttonIt’s a pretty straight forward sew for such a classy item of clothing. You have the option of the collar or round or pixie hood. Lengthwise you can make a shrug, classic length or cloak length. It can also be made reversible. The number of buttons is also down to personal preference.

I went with the collared, classic length for my first attempt and used a black and white wool boucle blend (8% wool/ 92% polyester) with a black pongee lining (100% polyester). My wool was a nightmare and frayed like crazy so I had to serge all my pattern pieces before assembly and then also used Fray Stopper in the corners and where I thought there may be some strain.

As aforementioned construction was quick and simple, took me about 2 hours start to finish including taping and cutting out the pattern.

cape front 3

                           cape side 2 cape back 2

I also chose to test the shrug version. I initially had visions of ‘faux’ fur and pleather but couldn’t find the appropriate fabric so went with premium black cotton sateen (96% cotton/ 4% spandex) and black printed sateen pluses (97% cotton/ 3% spandex) for the “lining” but really I was planning on making it reversible, thus using the same fabric. I followed the instructions as specified and then simply added a button to the outside and inside in the same position so the loop works for both buttons.

    Black side              Black back 3

Pattern back 3Pattern side

It’s a well drafted pattern with a nice curve for a good fit around the shoulders. There are optional lengthen/shorten lines included. The possibilities are endless with this pattern depending on fabric choice. Really happy with the outcomes of this test and am so looking forward to wearing them.

Stay tuned for a kids version coming soon!!!

*The pattern was provided to me free of charge for testing but all opinions expressed are my own and I received a copy of the finalised pattern for taking part.