Tulle Skirt by Rebecca Page

I know little girls love to have big fluffy skirts that they can play dress ups with and twirl but I’m sure secretly some adults do to. I think as the lines of fashion become more blurred and there aren’t really as many rules anymore, I thought to myself, why not make myself a big, poofy skirt too.

Rebecca Page recently released the Tulle Skirt for Ladies** which I tested, not really quite sure how it would fit into my wardrobe. I originally envisioned Hollywood glam but as you can see, inner rock chic took over. The pattern itself isn’t very difficult, it’s just time consuming because of the layers and having to gather each later. I chose the less gathered version because of my fabric choices and knowing that they would make it full on their own. This is a fitted waistband pattern, not an elastic one, and there is an invisible zipper at the back. The size range is XXS to 5XL and although labelled a beginner pattern which is probably correct, I think it could get tricky for a beginner.

                                      

My lining is black top pop poplin (100% polyester) and my first layer is black polyester netting (100% polyester) and quite stiff, adding lots of body. My top layer is black crystal organza (100%  nylon). My waistband is made from black winston satin (100% polyester), I wanted something that would add a bit more glam. The skirt is also designed to be tea length so keep that in mind if you want something longer, you will have to allow for extra fabric. Given my fabrics are poly’s this is a wash and wear type skirt that won’t require any special care and maintenance which is great for me.

I’m not going to lie, care is required when sewing on the waistband as I got my under layers caught from underneath a couple of times. Also I hemmed my lining as instructed, the netting I just cut as straight as possible and with the organza I didn’t want to do any treatment that would shorten the length such as a rolled hem and leaving it raw wasn’t and option because it frays. I essentially used a really narrow, short zig zag stitch which worked out perfectly. This is perhaps something to keep in mind if using different types of materials for the different layers.

Check out my zipper, it’s invisible!!!

               

I think there are lots of variations/hacks to be done to this pattern. The instructions include a ribbon hem finish but you could also add a separate ruffle piece at the bottom, maxify the skirt or even to each layer a different length. For now I will stick to my one version. I now it’s too early to talk about, but this may also become my festive season skirt this year.

Although this is a relatively time consuming sew, I think the outcome is great, not to mention the feeling of satisfaction and happiness when you wear it for the first time.

**This post contains affiliate links to Rebecca Page Patterns

 

 

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The Rivier Dress by The Eli Monster

So, I have joined The Eli Monster Brand Ambassador program and this months’ theme was spooky or sweet. I of course went for sweet, because that’s what little girls are made of :), although I was tempted to do spooky and make a purple and black witches dress. I just thought sweet would get more mileage though.

My inspiration was the colour of candy given that Halloween is such a sugar fest, but I also wanted some romantic element. I chose to make The Rivier Dress (* affiliate link) because I could add soft ruffles, tulle and a bow, very girly indeed.

This dress has a faux/partial wrap bodice with two sets of snaps at the sides, so it’s an easy dress in that you don’t need to insert a zipper. The skirt is a simple gathered one and the neckline can be super simple or ruffled and then there is a sleeveless or cap sleeves option. The pattern ranges from size 18mo up to teen 16, and that is a lot of use for a pattern.

All of The Eli Monster’s patterns feature the layered option and there are color photographs with the instructions. There is a cut chart for all rectangular pieces instead of pattern pieces, to save on both ink and paper and while some people prefer pattern pieces for everything, I’m happy to adapt to either option.

 

For my version, the bodice is completely lined with white broadcloth (100% cotton) and the main exterior fabric is floral printed poplin scattered white (100% cotton) overlayed with soft bridal tulle in mushroom colour (100% nylon). I sewed everything as instructed in the pattern however I sewed the floral and netting as two separate layers up until I sewed them onto the bodice. I used French seams for the netting and cut it to the length specified in the pattern and because I didn’t hem it, it’s longer than the under skirt, which is what I was going for. I also made a size bigger than I should have because I wanted my daughter to get more use out of it but it has ended up a bit big and long although she still adores it.

I chose to make the optional bow with cherry broadcloth (100% cotton), but wasn’t sure at the time if it was too much, but in the end I thought it finished off the dress. I did attach it to a brooch pin instead of to the dress so it is detachable and also can function as a hair brooch.

It’s very feminine and my daughter loves it so that’s a great end to this sweet tale. The Rivier Dress is currently on sale for $7.00 but check out The Eli Monster to get some other great patterns that you can adapt to suit any occasion.

*This post contains affiliate links to The Eli Monster Patterns

Pretty in Pink Lame Skirt and Jacquard Dress

I thought I’d post these two outfits here in the one post as there isn’t too much to say for either and they share the common theme of the colour pink because I happen to have girls that love pink.

First up is the lame three tier ruffle skirt. I made this outfit to match big sister at a recent family event. I used the left over japanese tissue lame in rose white (45% nylon/55% metal), pink bridal tulle, stash lace and metro linen in petal (100% linen).

3 tier ruffle skirt

   3 tier ruffle skirt details

The close up is a true indication of the colours.

I essentially made this skirt up as I went along. I first made the linen layer with a 103cm x 24cm rectangle joined together with french seams and finished with a machine rolled hem. Then I attached two layers of soft stretch tulle to minimise irritation against the skin. Each layer was a rectangle of 176cm x 23cm with french seams and the hem left raw. Third layer was the lame cut at a completed size of 129cm x 16cm. I had to piece this together with 3 separate pieces as I only had scraps left from the Haven dress. I french seamed the short edges and did a machine rolled hem. The final layer was some lace of a length of 129cm. As you have probably noticed, although I did try and keep consistent with the lengths of each layer, I was using stash and scrap fabric so often just went with the lengths I had. All layers were gathered individually before layering and attaching on top of one another.

lame front

             lame front 2 lame side

The waistband was made up of two rectangles each 61cm x 8cm, joined with french seams and then attached to the skirt layers. I machine stitched the waistband on the inside leaving an opening to thread through a 47cm length of 2cm wide elastic and then machine stitched closed. It turned out pretty cute but was in desperate need of a matching top. I took the easy way out and purchase a plain white t-shirt and removed the sleeves. I added two layers of the soft stretch tulle at the upper armholes and 2 layers of thin lace at the neckline, finished off with a pink ribbon bow, all from the stash. I wanted to carry the tulle and lace them through from the skirt and think I achieved a complete outfit. I also made a matching hair clip so she was wearing handmade from top to bottom.

lace top front                  lace top details 

Outfit two is a pink jacquard satin (unknown fibre content) dress. I was originally making this for my eldest as more of a tunic but once it was finished the proportions looked off so I have kindly gifted it to my baby but it now requires some fit adjustments.

jacquard dress front

                       jacquard dress front 2  jacquard dress side

I used the purple rose party dress pattern from nestfullofeggs. For the bodice and I only extended down the length 5 inches as opposed to 6 inches as instructed. The jacquard frays so much that I serged all my individual fabric pattern pieces before even beginning construction. I chose to line the bodice and just used some stash white top pop poplin 8925 (80% poly/20% cotton) using the “bagging” method so that all seams were enclosed, and then I understitched wherever possible. I inserted a 20cm (8″) white invisible zip for the closure.

The skirt was constructed using a top and bottom ruffle layer of jacquard each 112cm long x 3 inch wide finished with a machine rolled hem. The eyelet layer was 133cm long as that was the length I had and used the entire width of the eyelet. Each layer was attached to a middle tier which was the width of the bodice of 70cm x 3 inch wide, except the top jacquard layer. Each tier/layer was closed in the round first and then attached to one another.

It probably isn’t too noticeable from the photos but the neckline is in fact too wide for this cherub and falls off her shoulders. I am contemplating how to alter the dress without having to take it apart. I am actually thinking of sewing some ribbon at the back shoulders to keep the dress from falling off until she grows a bit so she can wear this before it gets too short otherwise I may cut out a wedge from the centre back where the zip was and adding a button and loop closure. What do you suggest?

jacquard dress back